Bright Memory: Infinite Review for Nintendo Switch

Chinese Shooting: The Nintendo Switch is celebrating its 5th anniversary this year. Despite the outdated hardware even at the time of release, the console was able to attract tens of millions of players. This success also attracted publishers, who by hook or by crook began to try to port their hits to the hybrid system.

However, there is definitely a shortage of quality first-person shooters on the platform. The explanation is quite simple – this genre has high requirements for detailing the environment, and when porting to a weak console, you have to sacrifice too much.

However, this does not stop some, which is proved by the experience of Bethesda, which transferred several parts of DOOM and Wolfenstein to the Switch. True, they looked soapy, because the developers had to cut a lot to make these games work.

Things are no better for EA. Apex Legends, released in 2021, still makes our editors watery. Added to this was the fact that in more or less serious firefights, performance hit the bottom.

This week we are analyzing another representative of the “impossible ports” category. We are talking about the shooter Bright Memory: Infinite from the Chinese from FYQD-Studio.

At the beginning of 2022, the editors of GameMAG.ru already released a review of the PC version of the game. We advise you to familiarize yourself with it, because much of it is relevant even now.

Briefly, the disposition is as follows. Infinite is a very short (takes a couple of hours), but adrenaline-fuelled mix of shooter and action. The player takes control of agent Sheila Tan, who is sent to deal with a black hole that has appeared over a remote island. The soldiers of the evil General Lin, as well as the ancient warriors and monsters who have broken through the space-time continuum, will oppose the girl.

However, Sheila has something to answer the offenders. In her arsenal are four firearms (automatic, shotgun, pistol and sniper rifle), a combat prosthetic arm (allows you to attract enemies and launch an EMP wave) and a powerful sword. All this is allowed to be combined. The main thing is to keep an eye on the scale of endurance and the number of rounds.

As you know, the Bright Memory prologue was made by one developer from China. But a small team was already working on Infinite. Despite this, the game does not boast any deep story or polished gameplay.

However, the foundation here turned out to be quite strong. Local weapons are a pleasure to shoot, and enemies are well animated and effectively catch bullets. The same can be said about the use of the sword. But with gameplay situations there was a gag. Despite the abundance of available options, local levels are not particularly conducive to the use of special abilities. More than once or twice there was a situation when Sheila gets into very small arenas, where there is simply nowhere to turn around. The worst option is the very first boss.

There are also problems with the gameplay. If the enemy hits the heroine with a projectile, then her acceleration is reset, which puts an end to maneuverability. In addition, stamina is constantly lacking, and if you are stuck in a place with a minimum of health, then this is a guaranteed death.

On consoles, things are exacerbated by the odd skill layout. Let’s say two abilities are tied to the left bumper – pulling an enemy and using an EMP charge. However, for the whole game, we did not understand how to pull the enemy for subsequent shredding, so as not to use the shock wave. Abilities were activated randomly. This is superimposed and a very aggressive system of fine-tuning the sight on the target.

Hurricane action developers are trying to dilute at the expense of quieter segments. In particular, we are talking about stealth, driving a car, overcoming obstacles and … hunting for wild boars.

But none of the listed options are polished. Stealth turned out to be short and very rudimentary, the car constantly got stuck in objects, dead boars disappeared at attention, and the mechanics of running along the walls barely worked.

Bright Memory: Infinite is a very short game that lacks a lot of polish and variety. However, this is not the end of the story, because our editors asked for the Nintendo Switch version for review.

Infinite is not just modern, which already creates problems when porting. We have a shooter here on Unreal Engine 4, which only exacerbates the complexity of optimization.

How did the developers cope with the test? Very…ambiguous.

Let’s start with the positives. So, Bright Memory: Infinite on the Nintendo Switch produces a very stable 30 frames per second. This is a serious achievement for a platform with such weak hardware, which has the most positive effect on playability.

However, FYQD-Studio achieved this at the expense of severely reducing graphics. It’s not just about reducing the resolution of textures, the quality of shadows, and so on. Apparently, Infinite works at an extremely low resolution, on the basis of which the final image is reconstructed.

It appears to be taking a similar approach to what Techland took with their Switch port of Dying Light, but much more aggressive.

At first, it seems that the idea is working, because no soap is felt. However, one has only to look closely at the picture, as the hair begins to move on the head.

The fact is that any movement and special effect generates fireworks from squares, which is why in the midst of a battle it can be difficult to see the enemy behind shots or sword strikes. This is superimposed on ladders and regular problems with loading textures (the game copes very badly with a sharp change in camera angles). Instead of grass, some kind of ripples appear, and you have to admire the pixel porridge in the sky.

A separate song is the draw distance. In some places we have seen buildings that hang in the air, because the walls of the first floor simply did not appear. Sometimes white portals to hell were seen (due to the quick change in the camera view, objects do not have time to load). Against this background, the Chinese attempts to show the main character as a sexy Femme Fatale look absurd. In Infinite, Sheila has a set of revealing outfits, and the developers constantly show off her breasts and ass. But in the Switch version, the heroine constantly frightens with soapy textures, buggy skirt physics and an absolutely dead look.

There are also unique features of the port. Loads in Infinite are very long, which in the end becomes annoying. Everything is aggravated by the risk of running into a softlock. This happened to us twice. In one of the scenes, the script refused to run to advance further in the level, and in the other we got stuck on the roof due to the fact that the cartridges in the machine ran out (it was necessary to blow up all the boats to advance).

Bright Memory: Infinite for Nintendo Switch is not a AAA release from a big and very greedy publisher. However, this is another example of the fact that the desire to release an “impossible port” at any cost is not always a good decision.

 

There are also problems with the gameplay. If the enemy hits the heroine with a projectile, then her acceleration is reset, which puts an end to maneuverability. In addition, stamina is constantly lacking, and if you are stuck in a place with a minimum of health, then this is a guaranteed death.

On consoles, things are exacerbated by the odd skill layout. Let’s say two abilities are tied to the left bumper – pulling an enemy and using an EMP charge. However, for the whole game, we did not understand how to pull the enemy for subsequent shredding, so as not to use the shock wave. Abilities were activated randomly. This is superimposed and a very aggressive system of fine-tuning the sight on the target.

Hurricane action developers are trying to dilute at the expense of quieter segments. In particular, we are talking about stealth, driving a car, overcoming obstacles and … hunting for wild boars.

But none of the listed options are polished. Stealth turned out to be short and very rudimentary, the car constantly got stuck in objects, dead boars disappeared at attention, and the mechanics of running along the walls barely worked.

Bright Memory: Infinite is a very short game that lacks a lot of polish and variety. However, this is not the end of the story, because our editors asked for the Nintendo Switch version for review.

Infinite is not just modern, which already creates problems when porting. We have a shooter here on Unreal Engine 4, which only exacerbates the complexity of optimization.

How did the developers cope with the test? Very…ambiguous.

Let’s start with the positives. So, Bright Memory: Infinite on the Nintendo Switch produces a very stable 30 frames per second. This is a serious achievement for a platform with such weak hardware, which has the most positive effect on playability.

However, FYQD-Studio achieved this at the expense of severely reducing graphics. It’s not just about reducing the resolution of textures, the quality of shadows, and so on. Apparently, Infinite works at an extremely low resolution, on the basis of which the final image is reconstructed.

It appears to be taking a similar approach to what Techland took with their Switch port of Dying Light, but much more aggressive.

At first, it seems that the idea is working, because no soap is felt. However, one has only to look closely at the picture, as the hair begins to move on the head.

The fact is that any movement and special effect generates fireworks from squares, which is why in the midst of a battle it can be difficult to see the enemy behind shots or sword strikes. This is superimposed on ladders and regular problems with loading textures (the game copes very badly with a sharp change in camera angles). Instead of grass, some kind of ripples appear, and you have to admire the pixel porridge in the sky.

A separate song is the draw distance. In some places we have seen buildings that hang in the air, because the walls of the first floor simply did not appear. Sometimes white portals to hell were seen (due to the quick change in the camera view, objects do not have time to load). Against this background, the Chinese attempts to show the main character as a sexy Femme Fatale look absurd. In Infinite, Sheila has a set of revealing outfits, and the developers constantly show off her breasts and ass. But in the Switch version, the heroine constantly frightens with soapy textures, buggy skirt physics and an absolutely dead look.

There are also unique features of the port. Loads in Infinite are very long, which in the end becomes annoying. Everything is aggravated by the risk of running into a softlock. This happened to us twice. In one of the scenes, the script refused to run to advance further in the level, and in the other we got stuck on the roof due to the fact that the cartridges in the machine ran out (it was necessary to blow up all the boats to advance).

Bright Memory: Infinite for Nintendo Switch is not a AAA release from a big and very greedy publisher. However, this is another example of the fact that the desire to release an “impossible port” at any cost is not always a good decision.

Shovel Knight

Game completed on:

SWITCH

Correct topics:
yes

Duration:
2 hours

 

Platforms:

SWITCH
PC

Developer:

FYQD-Studio

Publisher:

Playism Games

Genres:

action
shooter

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