Genie Movie Explained: What’s Up With the Ending?

On Wednesday, November 22, the Christmas fantasy comedy Genie starring Melissa McCarthy was released on Peacock. It is a remake of the 1991 British television film Bernard and the Genie. The script for both films was written by famous cinematographer Richard Curtis. In the review below we tell you whether the author of “Love Actually” was able to convey the fabulous spirit of Christmas through the silver screen this time.

Pros:

as always, an energetic transformation from Melissa McCarthy; bright Christmas surroundings; The genie’s obsession with Tomm Krug looks funny

Minuses:

unforgivably weak comedy component in general; absolute sterility in everything about the film – from the authors’ attempts to once again express obvious morals to the emotions that it can evoke

“Genie” / Genie

Genre Christmas fantasy comedy
Directed by Sam Boyd
Starring Melissa McCarthy, Paapa Essiedu, Denis Benton, Alan Cumming, Luis Guzman, indirectly Tom Cruise
Peacock Premiere
Year of release 2023
IMDb website

Bernard, very busy at work, was getting ready to go home when suddenly his boss forced him to give an unplanned presentation. Because of this, the man missed the birthday of his 8-year-old daughter Eva and, being late, gave her the first item he found on the shelf, carelessly wrapped in the most ordinary package. Unable to endure such mockery, Bernard’s wife Julie quickly packed her things and drove off to her mother, leaving the unfortunate congratulator in splendid isolation.

Somehow, upset Bernard catches the eye of Eva’s “gift” – a box, obviously purchased in an antique shop. The hero does not even have time to blink an eye when a strange lady appears in front of him, introducing herself as a real genie named Flora. A living camel as proof of these words turns out to be a rather convincing argument, and Bernard is already thinking about how to take advantage of his new opportunities to regain what he lost. But it seems that when it comes to human relationships, any magic will be powerless.

The authors of “Genie” and, in particular, Richard Curtis, turned their attention to an old British television film, which few people remember today, and for some reason decided to make an American remake. The screenwriter of “Notting Hill”, “Bridget Jones’s Diary” and many other famous projects, as well as the author of the Christmas hit “Love Actually”, took up writing the script this time too.

Since the role of the genie involved a lot of fun and jokes, it was rightly entrusted to the famous comedic actress Melissa McCarthy, who is capable of imparting the necessary energy to even mediocre comedies. Well, that’s pretty much what this one turned out to be. No matter how much McCarthy shone in the frame, she was unable to save the film from complete mediocrity.

The problem is that the original boasted witty, sometimes distinctly British-tinged humor, while the remake tries to capitalize on the jokes of its predecessor without offering anything in return. Some lines are repeated verbatim.

Among the interesting differences we can note: the passion for hamburgers instead of savoring pizza here; a cartoonishly funny doorman, of whom not a trace remains in the remake, as well as the worship of Tom Cruise with his “Mission”, which replaced “Terminator 2”.

Along with Curtis, Alan Cumming, who played the main role of Bernard in the original film, did not neglect to participate in the remake. Here he played the episodic role of an evil rich man of a clearly Dickensian kind, which was previously performed by Rowan Atkinson, another regular in Curtis’s projects, with whom the screenwriter and director began collaborating back in the late 70s.

From a technical point of view, the modern film, of course, looks more solid. But he is unable to stand out in any way among the many sterile Christmas comedies of the latest type that are rapidly proliferating on streaming services. Even apart from its British predecessor, Genie is a blatant mediocrity with a lazy plot and weak humor.

Considering the situation in which the main character found himself and its outcome, it becomes obvious that the guy did not need the help of a genie, but none other than the Time Stone – it was not for nothing that the local doorman constantly chatted about the multiverse.

In fact, everyone understands the simple moral of such stories: no magic can help you draw the right conclusions regarding your own mistakes until you come to this yourself. Unless the magic of a Christmas movie has a chance to influence something. But the latter in no way relates to this opus.

Conclusion:

“Genie” has become another seasonal product of the production line of streaming services, which even its creators will not remember tomorrow. What can we say about the audience?

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