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The Skeleton Twins movie review

the-skeleton-twins

The Skeleton Twins is the sort of movie that can best be summed up by our good friend David (as portrayed by Cary Elwes) from Seinfeld. 

David-cary-elwes-seinfeld

“Is this a good movie? Yes. Is it pretentious as hell? Yes.”

I never thought about it until now, but something can be pretentious and still be good.  It’s not always true, but this is a case where it is.  If I have to sit there at the end of the movie and try to figure out their goldfish metaphor, the movie gets filed under pretentious, but nevertheless, I still enjoyed the movie.

Director Craig Johnson uses not only strong performances from his cast (Kristen Wigg and Bill Hader as the titular characters are backed up by Luke Wilson and Ty Burrell) but his own behind the camera skills to elevate the script he coauthored with Mark Heyman.  In the hands of a different team, this movie could be awful, but instead, it’s inviting, funny, heartfelt… and yes, pretentious.  Wigg is so good at making you like a somewhat unlikable character while Hader is the most charming MoFu on earth.  Wilson’s character development comes largely from his own performance while Burrell is just a stone cold bad guy with no arc, but that’s OK.  It’s a long 93 minutes, but it doesn’t bother me – the movie is a bit padded (two dance montages is pushing it), but that doesn’t mean that these scenes don’t inform us about the characters or reinforce ideas that had already been presented.  You can repeat yourself if you’re good at presenting it and have great performers.

I think The Skeleton Twins will please fans of both comedy and drama and therefore, I have to give it a general recommendation for everyone but kids.  It’s not a perfect movie, but it’s fair to say that it’s damn good.

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About Jamie Insalaco

Jamie Insalaco is the author of CreativeJamie.com, BomberBanter.com and editor in chief of ComicBookClog.com

Posted on September 21, 2015, in movie review and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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