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The Hundred-Foot Journey (quick movie review)

The Hundred-Foot Journey features great photography, color pallet and a marvelous cast that brings their A game, but as the movie drags on, its endless montages and meandering subplots turn a quality film into a movie that can’t keep your interest.

The movie sets itself up as being about a conflict between two restaurants and a family’s struggle to stay together, but its subplot concerning Manish Dayal’s career as a chef as well as the additional subplot regarding his romance with Charlotte Le Bon’s character don’t support the main plot. These two subplots are parasites on the primary story and don’t feel like an organic extension (the way the romantic subplot between Om Puri and Helen Mirren does), but instead, a budding tumor that takes over.

Everyone’s performance is great in this flick, but Helen Mirren and Om Puri are especially wonderful. Om Puri, who I’ve only seen sparsely in movies in small roles, immediately gives legs to the flick; he makes you feel like you’ve seen him in a thousand starring roles. His performance is especially impressive when you take into account that he plays opposite the likes of Helen Mirren.

There’s a lot of good things happening in The Hundred-Foot Journey, but there’s only so many ways you can photograph someone cracking an egg. I suspect this movie is only getting a wide release because the credits include, "Producers Oprah Winfrey and Steven Spielberg" because honestly, the flick just isn’t that great. At two hours and thirty-five minutes, you’ll find yourself mutting, "Wish I’d just read the book," as you run to the bathroom when it’s over.

I’m making it sound worse than it is, but that last hour is a mess. Here’s a 6.5 out of 10 for The Hundred-Foot Journey.

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About Jamie Insalaco

Jamie Insalaco is the author of CreativeJamie.com, BomberBanter.com and editor in chief of ComicBookClog.com

Posted on September 16, 2014, in movie review, vegan stuff and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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