Strangers on a Train (Better Know Your Hitchcock)

strangers-on-a-trainDr. Girlfriend and I are on a major Alfred Hitchcock kick, and we thought we’d take you along for the ride.  We’re going on a tour of some of his most famous films, a journey that’s sure to be filled with thrills, chills and other words that often appear on Hitchcock movie posters.  I’m not going to bother scoring or all out reviewing Hitchcock’s movies because they’re all great, all classics – this is more of an awareness campaign reminding you to check ’em out.  Today, we’re taking a look at Strangers on a Train.

Strangers on a Train is exactly what it sounds like:  two guys meet on a train and one the men (perhaps willfully) misunderstands the other when the idea of “swapping murders” is presented.  The idea is that if two guys have someone they’d like to kill, one guy kills the other guy’s victim so there’s no motive.  Just talking about this movie is nearly the entire basis for the movie Throw Mamma from the TrainStrangers is so good that you can just talk about it and act part of it out in another movie and still get away with making a halfway decent film.

I’m not familiar with Robert Walker, but he is friggin awesome in this flick.  Farley Granger is fine as the protagonist, but Walker runs this movie like… I dunno, Jesse Owens?  Or Bill Gates?  Which makes more sense?  Meh, let’s just say that Walker is really good in this movie.

Strangers on a Train is certainly near the top of my list of movies that have a kick ass ending.  The final scene in this movie is fantastic, and although I feel there are scenes that drag, the climax more than makes up for it.  (Feel free to apply this as an analogy elsewhere in your life.)

strangers-on-a-train-finale

I highly recommend Strangers on a Train – you’ll be saying “criss cross” at every opportunity!

alfred-hitchcockCheck out more Better know your Hitchcock.

About Jamie Insalaco

Jamie Insalaco is the author of CreativeJamie.com, BomberBanter.com and editor in chief of ComicBookClog.com

Posted on March 8, 2013, in movie review and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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